Artist

50 Cent

Biography of 50 Cent
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50 Cent Biography

Curtis James Jackson III, known in the music world as 50 Cent, is an American rapper and entrepreneur, known for being one of the most prominent singers in rap and hip-hop. Curtis was born on July 6, 1975, in Queens, New York and is the son of Sabrina Jackson (drug dealer), and his father is not known.

In the decade of 1980, during the crack epidemic, 50 Cent began with the traffic of the substance, calling itself BooBoo. At the age of 8 he was already immersed in the world of drugs and weapons, and seven years later he was arrested for illegal possession of narcotics. For a while, he wanted to venture into boxing, where he was unsuccessful and quit at the age of 18. After a time of reflection, he left the drug business to begin work in rap and hip-hop.

 

MUSICAL CAREER

In 1996, a friend introduced him to Jam Master Jay of Run-DMC, who was starting his music label “Jam Master Jay Records.” Jay taught him how to count the measures, write the choirs, structure the songs, and make the records.

The first official appearance of 50 Cent was in a song titled “React” with the group Onyx, on the album “Shut ‘Em Down” released in 1998. A year later, after leaving Jam Master Jay, several producers of Trackmasters took notes on the rapper, whom they contacted to sign a contract with Columbia Records. Sometime later, he was sent to a studio in New York, where 36 songs were produced in two weeks, of which 18 were included in his unofficial release album, “The Power of the Dollar of 2000.” A work that ended up canceled.

50 Cent began to become popular after the release of his single “How to Rob.” Rappers like Jay-Z, Kurupt, Sticky Fingaz, Big Pun, among others, responded to the song. On the other hand, the rapper Nas received the theme in a positive way, so he invited 50 Cent to travel on a promotional tour of his album “Nastradamus.” The song was also destined to be released as a single from the album along with other songs. However, on May 24, 2000, 2 days before recording the video for “Thug Love,” the rapper was shot several times.

Despite having a publishing agreement signed with Columbia Records, he was expelled from the label and included in the blacklist of the recording industry, for his song “Ghetto Qu ‘Ran” ​​(“Koran of the ghetto”). He could not find a studio to record in the United States, so he traveled to Canada, where with his manager Sha Money XL, he recorded more than thirty songs for mixtapes. The recognition of 50 cent was increasing little by little, and in 2002, released the compilation album entitled “Guess Who’s Back?”

Around 2002, the rapper Eminem listened to a copy of ¿Guess Who’s Back?, which impressed him to the point that he decided to invite 50 Cent to Los Angeles, where he was introduced to Dr. Dre.

After signing a contract with Shady Records and Aftermath Entertainment, 50 Cent released the mixtape “No Mercy, No Fear” that included the track “Wanksta” which was used by Eminem in the soundtrack of 8 Mile.

In the month of February of 2003, 50 Cent released his debut album entitled “Get Rich or Die Tryin.” The album was a success, so much that Allmusic described it as one of the best debut albums promoted by a rap artist in a decade; and other media cataloged the album as a total boom. It was in the position number 1 in the Billboard 200, for managing to sell 872,000 copies in the first four days. The main song of the album and the one played the most was “In da Club” managing to reach the position number 18 of the 100 best hip hop songs of all time of VH1. He also broke the Billboard record as the song most listened to in radio history in a week.

In March of 2005, the album “The Massacre” went on sale, and sold more than 1.1 million copies in the first four days. With that album, 50 Cent reached number one on the Billboard 200 for six weeks and was the first artist to have three singles in the top 5 of Billboard in the same week with “Candy Shop”; “Inferno Disc” and “How We Do.”

On July 22, 2005, 50 Cent was sentenced to two years of probation, due to an incident in May 2004, on charges of three counts of assault and aggression.

Around September 2007, 50 Cent released his third studio album titled “Curtis.” It was in the number 2 position of the Billboard 200, after selling 691,000 copies in the first week.

On May 18, 2009, the song entitled “OK, You’re Right” was released, produced by Dr. Dre. This song was included on the album “Before I Self Destruct” as the first official single. That same year the rapper appeared in the new season of VH1 Behind the Music.

On November 16, 2011, Curtis released his song “Outlaw” to the internet, he was produced by Cardiak. By February 20, 2014, 50 Cent left Interscope Records, Shady Records, and Aftermath Entertainment, after an alliance that lasted 12 years. He and his label G-Unit Records signed a distribution agreement with Caroline Records and a recording contract with Capitol Records to date his fifth studio album Animal Ambition.

 

OTHER ACTIVITIES

In November 2003, he signed a 5-year contract with the sports brand Reebok to distribute a G-Unit Sneakers, his personal brand of the line as part of his G-Unit Clothing Company. That same year he released the video game, like 50 Cent: Bulletproof, which was created for PlayStation 2, Xbox and the PlayStation Portable.

In 2005, 50 Cent would make a cameo in the episode of The Simpsons “Pranksta Rap” in which his legal problems were shown. In that same year, he starred with Terrence Howard in the semi-autobiographical film Get Rich or Die Tryin’. In August 2005, he published an autobiography entitled “From Pieces to Weight: Once Upon a Time in Southside Queens,” which showed the cultural and economic forces that led him to sell cocaine and crack, the details of his business as a drug trafficker and then as a rapper. He also founded the film production companies G-Unit Films in 2007 and Cheetah Vision in 2008.

On January 4, 2007, 50 Cent launched his G-Unit Books print shop in the Time Warner building. On September 8, 2009, he published his book The 50th Law. In March of 2011, he founded SMS Audio in the state of Delaware.

 

DISCOGRAPHY

  • 2000: Power of the Dollar.
  • 2003: Get Rich or Die Tryin.
  • 2003: Beg for Mercy.
  • 2005: The Massacre.
  • 2007: Curtis.
  • 2008: T·O·S (Terminate on Sight)
  • 2009: Before I Self Destruct.
  • 2014: Animal Ambition.
  • 2014: The Beauty of Independence.
  • 2015: The Beast Is G-Unit.

 

FILMOGRAphy

CINE

  • 2005: Get Rich or Die Tryin’.
  • 2006: Home of the Brave.
  • 2008: Righteous Kill.
  • 2009: Before I Self Destruct.
  • 2009: Streets of Blood.
  • 2009: Dead Man Running.
  • 2010: Caught in the Crossfire.
  • 2010: 13.
  • 2010: Gun.
  • 2010: Twelve.
  • 2010: Morning Glory.
  • 2011: Vengeance.
  • 2011: Blood Out.
  • 2011: Setup.
  • 2011: All Things Fall Apart
  • 2012: Freelancers.
  • 2012: Fire with Fire.
  • 2013: Escape Plan.
  • 2013: Last Vegas.
  • 2013: The Frozen Ground
  • 2014: The Prince.
  • 2015: Spy.
  • 2015: Southpaw.

 

TELEVISION

  • 2005: Los Simpson.
  • 2008: 50 Cent: The Money and the Power.
  • 2009: Entourage.
  • 2013: Robot Chicken.

 

VIDEOGAMES

  • 2005: 50 Cent: Bulletproof
  • 2009: 50 Cent: Blood on the Sand
  • 2009: Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2

 

AWARDS

  • American Music Awards to Favorite Rap/Hip Hop Male Artist: 2003.
  • World Music Awards Best Artist of the Year: 2003.
  • World Music Awards Best New Artist: 2003.
  • Radio Music Awards Artist of the year, Hip Hop Radio: 2003.
  • Billboard Music Awards Album of the year, Get Rich or Die Tryin’: 2003.
  • Billboard Music Awards Artist of the year: 2003.
  • Billboard Music Awards Artist of the year R&B/Hip Hop: 2003.
  • Billboard Music Awards Rap Artist of the year: 2003.
  • Billboard Music Awards Artist of the year Hot 100 Male: 2003
  • BET Awards Best new artist: 2003.
  • BET Awards Best Hip Hop Male Artist: 2003.
  • American Music Awards Favorite Rap/Hip Hop Album, Get Rich or Die Tryin’: 2003.
  • MTV Video Music Awards Best Video Rap, In da Club: 2003.
  • MTV Video Music Awards Best new artist in a Video, In da Club: 2003.
  • Pop Music Awards Composer of the year: 2004.
  • International Dance Music Awards Best Rap/Hip Hop, In da Club: 2004.
  • Billboard Music Awards Single of the year Hot 100, In da Club: 2004.
  • Billboard Music Awards Ringtone of the year, In da Club: 2004
  • Rhythm & Soul Music Awards Composer of the year: 2004.
  • Rhythm & Soul Music Awards Top R&B/Hip Hop song, In Da Club: 2004.
  • Rhythm & Soul Music Awards Top Rap song, In Da Club: 2004.
  • World Music Awards Male artist with most sells: 2005.
  • American Music Awards Favorite Rap/Hip Hop album, The Massacre: 2005.
  • Pop Music Awards Best musical interpretation, In da Club and P.I.M.P.: 2005.
  • Billboard Music Awards Artist of the year Hot 100: 2005.
  • Billboard Music Awards Rap artist of the year: 2005.
  • Billboard Music Awards Artist of the year: 2005.
  • Billboard Music Awards Artist R&B/Hip Hop of the year: 2005.
  • Billboard Music Awards Best rap song, Candy Shop: 2005.
  • Billboard Music Awards Best Ringtone, Candy Shop: 2005.
  • Billboard Music Awards Best album, The Massacre: 2005.
  • Rhythm & Soul Music Awards Top ringtone of the year, In Da Club: 2005.
  • AVN Awards Best interactive DVD and Best music, Groupie Love: 2005.
  • Pop Music Awards Composer of the year: 2006.
  • MTV Video Music Awards Japan Best Hip-Hop video, Outta Control: 2006.
  • Rhythm & Soul Music Awards Composer of the year: 2006.
  • Rhythm & Soul Music Awards Top Rap song, How We Do: 2006.
  • Rhythm & Soul Music Awards Ringtone of the year, Candy Shop: 2006.
  • BET Hip Hop Awards Villain of the year: 2007.
  • World Music Awards Rap/Hip Hop artist with most sells: 2007.
  • Grammy Awards Best Rap Acting, Crack a Bottle» (50 Cent, Eminem y Dr. Dre): 2010.

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