Inventions

Emil Berliner

Emil Berliner Biography
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Emil Berliner Biography

Emil Berliner (May 20, 1851 – August 3, 1929) inventor. He was born in Hannover, Germany. He grew up in a Jewish environment. Due to a complex economic situation, he had to work to help his parents from a young age, so he did not attend school regularly. His first paid job was as a painter, for later, at age 16, to enter as a clerk in a food store.

According to his experience, he began to be interested in the production methods of the factory where he worked. He was a very versatile man since he built a weaving machine that improved existing ones; It was one of the many inventions of German. In 1869, when a system of repression against Jewish families was installed, Berliner obtained a position in a company located in Washington, United States. The family raised the money needed to support his trip and, especially, to prevent his son from being sent to the army ranks. Then, Emil settled in New York with the idea of ​​finding a job. He returned to Washington. Despite the economic difficulties, he studied at the Cooper Institute electricity and physics.

Motivated by scientists who were researching about the conversion of sound into electrical impulses that could be transmitted on wires; Berliner experimented with the electrical transmission of sound. Thanks to his research he was granted an assistant position of Dr. Constantine Fahlberg in his prestigious chemical laboratory. Soon he invented two electrical mechanisms that reproduced the sound more authentically and made it transmissible in the distance.

The responsibility for creating the prototypes of the microphone and the transformer was Berliner, the two basic mechanisms for electronic communication, in addition to building a carbon transmitter microphone and an iron diagram transmitter. It is clear that sometimes his inventions were inconvenient, but Berliner managed to solve these problems. Occasionally, he used objects that had not previously been used or integrated into an invention.

It was based on the telephone number of Reiss and Antonio Meucci and from there make some progress. Besides, he powered the device invented by Alexander Graham Bell. In this way, Berliner is identified as the inventor of the modern telephone. Berliner offered his invention to the subsidiary of the Bell Company in New York, the offer was finalized in the year of 1878 for $ 50,000. It was not long before the conflict with the Western Union arrived over the patent of the invention, the American courts appealed in favor of Berliner.

In 1881, together with his brother Joseph, he founded the Telephone-Fabrik Berliner, with branches in Vienna, Berlin, Budapest, London, and Paris. Later, he returned to Washington in 1883, where he advanced his independent research on the mechanical reproduction of sound. Berliner created new reproduction materials to improve his invention. One of his most significant contributions was the improvement of the phonograph, the first was patented in 1877.

I create a record player baptized gramophone, with a needle system that would be hegemonic until the end of the 20th century. In 1887 he patented his invention. A year later, the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia awarded him the Scott Medal for his contribution to the development of acoustics and sound reproduction. With collaboration, he founded the United States Gramophone Company in 1893; In 1897 he created the Berliner Gramophone Company in Montreal. He quickly arrived in Europe: he opened the Deutsche Gramaphon Gesellschaft and Britain’s Gramophone Co.

We must indicate that Berliner worked in other areas such as aeronautics. Then, he was the first to use a light internal combustion engine. His work was very important because years later he joined the airplanes. His son, Henry Berliner, designed a helicopter that flew successfully in early 1919. His interest in the problems of sound reproduction was greater, which is why he strove to create acoustic tiles for use in auditoriums and concert halls. His contribution was recognized in 1913 and he was awarded the Elliot Cresson Medal in recognition of his scientific contribution to telephony and acoustics. He died on August 3, 1929, as a result of a heart attack.

 

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